Cock a doodle doo

Cock a doodle do!
My dame has lost her shoe,
My master's lost his fiddlestick,
And knows not what to do.

Cock a doodle doo, an image of a rooster.

Cock a Doodle Doo nursery rhyme dates back to 17th century England. Children sang it to mock rooster's crowing. It was first published in 1765 in Mother Goose's Melody, more than a hundred years after its appearance. Later, three more verses were added.

The full 4-rhyme version of this nursery rhyme:

Cock a doodle do!
My dame has lost her shoe,
My master's lost his fiddlestick,
And knows not what to do.

Cock a doodle do!
What is my dame to do?
Till master's found his fiddlingstick,
She'll dance without her shoe.

Cock a doodle do!
My dame has found her shoe,
And master's found his fiddlingstick,
Sing cock a doodle do!

Cock a doodle do!
My dame will dance with you,
While master fiddles his fiddlingstick,
And knows not what to do.

It is also interesting to know how the sound of the rooster is interpreted by different nations of the world. In France, it's cocorico; in Italy chicchirichi. The Dutch, Danish, and Finnish children say kukeleku; German and Cech kids kikeriki; the Russians kukareku. In Icelandic, however, the word is gaggalago.